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Stargazing Lecture

Thursday, February 25, 2021
7:00pm to 9:00pm
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Online Event
Searching for the Violent Births and Deaths of Stars with Night-Vision Goggles
Kishalay De, PhD Candidate, Department of Astronomy, Caltech,
  • Public Event

Because this is an online event, the in-person stargazing that normally follows events in this series will not be possible.

NOTE: Change of Date to THURSDAY 2/25


Join the YouTube Livestream here: https://youtu.be/DSLz0ArtFc4

7:00–7:30 p.m. - Virtual Lecture
7:30–9:00 p.m. - Virtual Panel Q&A and Discussion

Since the beginning of civilization, humans have observed and recorded visible changes in the sky. Today, after decades of investigation, astronomers have created exquisite catalogs of stars that flare and dim to mark their births, deaths, and cataclysmic interactions. Yet, it is well known that a substantial fraction of stars in our own galaxy and beyond are obscured by interstellar dust absorbing and blocking their visible light. In this talk, we will learn why so many stars in the universe are hidden from human eyes, and how infrared observations allow us to pierce through the intervening dust to see them clearly. I will talk about recent technological developments (similar to night vision goggles) that are finally allowing us to scan the skies at infrared wavelengths and reveal the dynamic and explosive hidden universe.

About the Series

Stargazing Lectures are free lectures at a public level followed by a Q&A panel and guided stargazing with telescopes (weather permitting). All events are held at the Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics at Caltech. No reservations are needed. Lectures are 30 minutes; stargazing and panel Q&A last 90 minutes. Stay only as long as you want.

Stargazing is only possible with clear skies, but the lecture and panel Q&A takes place regardless of weather.

For directions, weather updates, and more information, please visit: http://outreach.astro.caltech.edu.

For more information, please contact Cameron Hummels by email at chummels@caltech.edu.